Walt Reeder

Dennis Edwards – Solo artist – Walt Reeder

Motown re-launched Edwards’ solo career, in 1984 with the hit single “Don’t Look Any Further,” a duet with Siedah Garrett.Walt Reeder Entertainment

When problems arose between Woodson and the Temptations in 1987, Edwards was brought back once again, but was himself replaced by Woodson in 1989 after being fired a third and final time by Williams.

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Dennis Edwards – The Temptations years

Later in 1967, Edwards quit the Contours and was placed back on retainer.

Ruffin had tipped Edwards off that he was being drafted as his replacement, which eased Edwards’ conscience in replacing him.

Walt Reeder Entertainment: Edwards was the first singer to join the Temptations after their “Classic 5” period. With his rougher gospel-hewn vocals, Edwards led the group through its psychedelic, funk, and disco periods, singing on hits such as “Cloud Nine” (1968), “I Can’t Get Next to You” (1969), “Ball of Confusion (That’s What the World is Today)” (1970), “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone” (1972), and “Shakey Ground” (1975), among others. Two of these songs, “Cloud Nine” and “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone”, won Grammy Awards.

Edwards remained in the Temptations until being fired by Otis Williams in 1977 just before the group’s departure from Motown to Atlantic Records. After a failed attempt at a Motown solo career, Edwards rejoined the Temptations in 1980, when they returned to Motown. In 1982, Edwards got the chance to sing with Ruffin and Eddie Kendricks as part of Reunion album and tour. Edwards began missing shows and rehearsals, and was replaced in 1984 by Ali-Ollie Woodson.

Walt Reeder:In 1989, Dennis Edwards was inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of The Temptations. Walt Reeder Entertainment

Dennis Edwards – 1990s
During the 1990s, Edwards began touring under the name ‘Dennis Edwards & the Temptations’, prompting a legal battle between himself and Otis Williams. It was decided that Edwards’ group would be called ‘The Temptations Review featuring Dennis Edwards’, the name that Edwards tours under to this day. Edwards’ current group includes Paul Williams Jr. (son of original Temptations member Paul Williams), David Sea, Mike Patillo, and Chris Arnold. Walt Reeder Entertainment

Walt Reeder: Edwards was portrayed by Charles Ley in the 1998 biographical television mini-series The Temptations, though he was not heavily focused upon, as the mini-series gave more attention to the Ruffin/Kendricks-era Temptations line up. Walt Reeder Entertainment

Walt Reeder

Dennis Edwards – Early years and career

Edwards was born in Fairfield, Alabama, As a teenager, Edwards joined a gospel vocal group called The Might Clouds of Joy, and studied music at the Detroit Conservatory of Music.Walt Reeder Entertainment

Following time served in the US military, in 1966 Edwards auditioned for Detroit’s Motown Records, where he was signed but placed on retainer. Walt Reeder

Walt Reeder Entertainment Ruffin, Kendricks, and Edwards

Edwards toured and recorded with fellow ex-Temptations Ruffin and Kendricks during the late 1980s as ‘Ruffin/Kendricks/Edwards, former leads of The Temptations’, although nothing was released. After the deaths of both Ruffin (1991) and Kendricks (1992), Edwards was forced to wrap up the project alone. In 1990 Dennis teamed up with Eddie Kendricks to release a dance/club track for A&B records entitled “Get it While it’s Hot”. The track was recorded at Fredrick Knight’s recording studio in the duo’s old home town of Birmingham, Alabama and produced and engineered by house music pioneer Alan Steward. The track created a lot of controversy as it contained a short rap sequence which did not sit very well with die hard Temptations fans.Walt Reeder: Edwards’ Don’t Look Any Further the Remix Album was released in 1998 containing updated dance mixes and the original 1984 track.
The Temptations Review featuring Dennis Edwards Walt Reeder

The Gap Band – Legacy – Walt Reeder Entertainment

Walt Reeder: The Gap Band – Early years

After having grown up with a Pentecostal minister father, Ronnie Wilson formed the Greenwood, Archer, and Pine Street Band in 1967, with Tuck Andress (later of Tuck and Patti), Roscoe “Toast” Smith and Chris Clayton. In 1972, Ronnie’s younger brother Charlie joined the band, and their younger brother Robert became the band’s bassist in 1973. Eventually the band would be condensed to comprise the trio of Ronnie, Robert and Charlie Wilson.

Early on, the group took on a funk sound more reminiscent of the early 70s. Simmons had recently gotten a distribution deal with Mercury/PolyGram.

Walt Reeder Entertainment

The Gap Band – American R&B and funk band

The Gap Band was an American R&B and funk band, who rose to fame during the 1970s and 1980s. Comprising brothers Charlie, Ronnie and Robert Wilson, the band first formed as the Greenwood, Archer and Pine Street Band in 1967 in their hometown of Tulsa, Oklahoma.
The group shortened its name to The Gap Band in 1973.

After 43 years together, they retired in 2010.(Walt Reeder Entertainment) Walt Reeder

The Gap Band – Later years

While their 1986 cover of “Going in Circles” went to #2 on the R&B charts, and the album it was released on, Gap Band VII hit #6 R&B, the album almost became their first in years to miss the Billboard 200, peaking at a mere #159.

Although they were beginning to struggle stateside, the group found their greatest success in the UK when their 1987 single “Big Fun” from Gap Band 8 reached #4 in the UK Singles Chart. 1988’s Straight from the Heart was their last studio album with Total Experience.

The Gap Band caught a small break in 1988 with the Keenan Ivory Wayans film I’m Gonna Git You Sucka. They contributed the non-charting “You’re So Cute” and the #14 R&B title track to the film (The first was not on the soundtrack, but was used in the film). Their first song on their new label, Capitol Records, 1989’s “All of My Love” (from their album Round Trip), is, to date, their last #1 R&B hit. The album also produced the #8 R&B “Addicted to Your Love” and the #18 R&B “”We Can Make It Alright.” They left Capitol records the next year and went on a five year hiatus from producing new material.

During the 1990s, the band released three non-charting studio albums and two live albums. The only album to chart was the live album Live & Well, which peaked at #54 R&B in 1996. Walt Reeder Entertainment

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Walt Reeder Entertainment: The Gap Band – Sampling

Since the 1990s, many The Gap Band hits have been sampled and covered by R&B and Hip-Hop artists such as Ashanti, Soul For Real, Nas, 69 Boyz, Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube, Jermaine Dupri, Da Brat, II D Extreme, Blackstreet, Shaquille O’Neal, Vesta, Mia X, Big Mello and Mary J. Blige. “Outstanding” was sampled for a 1990s commercial for malt liquor, it was also sampled by hit producer Heavy D for his boy band prodigies Soul For Real’s hit single “Every Little Thing” which reached #17 on the Hot 100 Charts at the time of release. Musicians inspired by The Gap Band include R. Kelly, Keith Sweat, Ruff Endz, Guy, Blackstreet, II D Extreme, Mint Condition, Jagged Edge, D’Extra Wiley, and Aaron Hall.

“You Dropped a Bomb on Me” was featured in the hit 2004 videogame Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, playing on the fictional funk radio station Bounce FM.
“Burn Rubber On Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me)” was featured in DiRT 3 Walt Reeder

The Gap Band – Success – Walt Reeder Entertainment:

When Lonnie signed them, the group had twelve musicians. The group dropped most of their personnel. Raymond Calhoun (writer of “Outstanding”), Oliver Scott (co-writer of “Yearning For Your Love), and arranger/producer Malvin Dino Vice (co-writer of “Boys Are Back in Town”) were retained as members of the backing band and major contributors to the Gap Band’s later recordings. On their first Simmons-produced album, The Gap Band, they found chart success with songs such as “I’m in Love” and “Shake”, the latter becoming a Top 10 R&B hit in 1979.

Later that year, the group released “I Don’t Believe You Want to Get Up and Dance (Oops!)” on their album The Gap Band II. Although it did not hit the Hot 100, it soared to #4 R&B. The song, and the band’s musical output as a whole, became more P-Funk-esque,

In 1980 Charlie and Ronnie provided background vocals on Stevie Wonder’s 1980 hit “I Ain’t Gonna Stand For It” from Wonder’s album Hotter Than July (1980).

The band reached a whole new level of fame in 1980 with the release of the #1 R&B and #16 Billboard 200 The Gap Band III. The band adopted a formula of quiet-storm ballads (such as the #5 R&B song “Yearning for Your Love” and “Are You Living”) supported by anthemic funk songs (such as the R&B chart-topper “Burn Rubber on Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me)” and “Humpin'”). They repeated this formula on the #1 R&B album Gap Band IV in 1982, which resulted in three hit singles: “Early in the Morning” (#1 R&B, #13 Dance, #24 Hot 100), “You Dropped a Bomb on Me” (#2 R&B, #31 Hot 100, #39 Dance), and “Outstanding” (#1 R&B, #24 Dance). It was during this time that former Brides of Funkenstein singer Dawn Silva joined them on tour.

Their 1983 effort, Gap Band V: Jammin’, went gold, but not quite as successful as the previous works, peaking at #2 R&B and #28 on the Billboard 200. The single “Party Train” peaked at #3 R&B and the song “Jam the Motha'” peaked at #16 R&B, but neither made it onto the Hot 100. The album’s closer “Someday” (a loose cover of Donny Hathaway’s “Someday We’ll All Be Free”) featured Stevie Wonder as a guest vocalist.

Their next work, Gap Band VI brought them back to #1 R&B in 1985, but the album sold fewer copies, and did not go gold. “Beep a Freak” hit #2 R&B and “I Found My Baby” peaked at #8 on the R&B charts, and “Disrespect” peaked at #18. That year, lead singer Charlie Wilson provided backing vocals on Zapp & Roger’s #2 R&B “Computer Love”. Walt Reeder