Dennis Edwards – Solo artist – Walt Reeder Entertainment

Dennis Edwards

Dennis Edwards (born February 3, 1943) is an American soul and R&B singer, most noted for being one of Motown act The Temptations’ lead singers. Edwards first joined the Temptations in 1968, replacing David Ruffin, and sung with the group until 1976, returning from 1980 to 1984 and 1987 to 1989. In the mid-1980s, he attempted a solo career, scoring a hit in 1984 with “Don’t Look Any Further” (featuring Siedah Garrett).

Walt Reeder Entertainment:Today, he is the lead singer of The Temptations Revue featuring Dennis Edwards, a Temptations splinter group.

Walt Reeder

Dennis Edwards – 1990s
During the 1990s, Edwards began touring under the name ‘Dennis Edwards & the Temptations’, prompting a legal battle between himself and Otis Williams. It was decided that Edwards’ group would be called ‘The Temptations Review featuring Dennis Edwards’, the name that Edwards tours under to this day. Edwards’ current group includes Paul Williams Jr. (son of original Temptations member Paul Williams), David Sea, Mike Patillo, and Chris Arnold. Walt Reeder Entertainment

Walt Reeder: Edwards was portrayed by Charles Ley in the 1998 biographical television mini-series The Temptations, though he was not heavily focused upon, as the mini-series gave more attention to the Ruffin/Kendricks-era Temptations line up. Walt Reeder

Dennis Edwards – Early years and career

Edwards was born in Fairfield, Alabama, As a teenager, Edwards joined a gospel vocal group called The Might Clouds of Joy, and studied music at the Detroit Conservatory of Music.Walt Reeder Entertainment

Following time served in the US military, in 1966 Edwards auditioned for Detroit’s Motown Records, where he was signed but placed on retainer. Walt Reeder

Walt Reeder Entertainment

Dennis Edwards – Solo artist – Walt Reeder Entertainment

Motown re-launched Edwards’ solo career, in 1984 with the hit single “Don’t Look Any Further,” a duet with Siedah Garrett.Walt Reeder

When problems arose between Woodson and the Temptations in 1987, Edwards was brought back once again, but was himself replaced by Woodson in 1989 after being fired a third and final time by Williams. Walt Reeder

Dennis Edwards – The Temptations years

Later in 1967, Edwards quit the Contours and was placed back on retainer.

Ruffin had tipped Edwards off that he was being drafted as his replacement, which eased Edwards’ conscience in replacing him.

Walt Reeder Entertainment: Edwards was the first singer to join the Temptations after their “Classic 5” period. With his rougher gospel-hewn vocals, Edwards led the group through its psychedelic, funk, and disco periods, singing on hits such as “Cloud Nine” (1968), “I Can’t Get Next to You” (1969), “Ball of Confusion (That’s What the World is Today)” (1970), “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone” (1972), and “Shakey Ground” (1975), among others. Two of these songs, “Cloud Nine” and “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone”, won Grammy Awards.

Edwards remained in the Temptations until being fired by Otis Williams in 1977 just before the group’s departure from Motown to Atlantic Records. After a failed attempt at a Motown solo career, Edwards rejoined the Temptations in 1980, when they returned to Motown. In 1982, Edwards got the chance to sing with Ruffin and Eddie Kendricks as part of Reunion album and tour. Edwards began missing shows and rehearsals, and was replaced in 1984 by Ali-Ollie Woodson.

Walt Reeder:In 1989, Dennis Edwards was inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of The Temptations. Walt Reeder Entertainment

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Morris Day – 1990s – Walt Reeder Entertainment

Morris Day – 2000 to present – Walt Reeder

Day came out of his self-imposed retirement because of his fans’ support. Day has remained a popular concert draw since the late 1990s, fronting a revamped lineup of The Time, including originals Jellybean Johnson on drums and Monte Moir on keyboards. The band was invited to perform on Prince’s direct to video concert film, “Rave Un2 The Year 2000”, in December 1999.

Day has also appeared regularly in local television commercials for a Toyota dealership in the Atlanta area.

As of 2007, Day is band leader on the TV One program Baisden After Dark.

He reunited with the original members of The Time after 18 years for a performance with Rihanna at the 50th Grammy Awards show.

Morris Day and The Time performed at the 2008 HR Florida State Conference.

Morris Day is now performing with his new band called The Original 7ven the band includes most of the members of the original band The Time hence the name.Walt Reeder Entertainment

The new album was released in 2011 and is called Condensate.

Walt Reeder

Morris Day – 1990s – Walt Reeder Entertainment

It wasn’t until 1990 that The Time scored a #1 R&B hit with “Jerk Out,” a Dance-funk cut from their reunited fourth album, Pandemonium. This album also featured the original members of the band. The same year, Day formed his own girl band (not unlike Prince’s Vanity 6/Apollonia 6) called The Day Zs. The group’s first and only album release was produced by Day and he sang on one of the tracks called “Green Acres.”

From that high point, Day’s success began to wane. The general decline of Prince’s popularity soon after did not help, and Day’s public visibility and creative output waned considerably. Walt Reeder Entertainment

Morris Day – Appearances in popular culture – Walt Reeder

In the 1980s and 1990s, WWF wrestler “Birdman” Koko B. Ware used “The Bird” as his entrance theme.

He appeared with The Time at the end of the movie Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back and was referred to as the main characters’ favorite band. Walt Reeder

In 1994, Day was featured on and provided the chorus and accompanying vocals for rapper K-Dee’s song “Gigolos Get Lonely Too” from the Ass, Gas, or Cash (No One Rides for Free) album. This song was essentially a direct sampling of a similarly named “Gigolos Get Lonely Too”, recorded by The Time in the 80’s.

A song called “Morris Day” appears on the album Felt, Vol. 2: A Tribute to Lisa Bonet by the hip-hop group Felt.

Mentioned in Dirt Nasty’s song 1980. Walt Reeder Entertainment

Walt Reeder

Morris Day – Acting career – Walt Reeder Entertainment

Day continued to act in films from time to time in small parts (including a brief but memorable turn in Richard Pryor’s Moving, and the Andrew “Dice” Clay (1990 film) The Adventures of Ford Fairlane). Day’s presence on the screen decreased until, in 2001, he returned to film in Kevin Smith’s Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, performing “Jungle Love” with The Time and dancing with the movie’s stars in the film’s coda, and being introduced emphatically by Jason Mewes’ character as “Morris Day and The motherfuckin’ Time!”.

Day also appeared on the small screen in 1990 when he portrayed the character Lamarr on ABC’s short-lived sitcom New Attitude. He guest-starred on the sitcom Eve as a pimp who wanted Eve’s fashion boutique to design a flamboyant suit to match his witty personality, and appeared as himself in an episode on the series Moesha, attempting to file a lawsuit against Moesha’s ex-boyfriend Q, who used a sample from “The Oak Tree” without permission. He also appeared on 227 in the 80’s.

He appeared opposite James Avery and Matthew Stewart in a pilot called Heart & Soul. Walt Reeder Entertainment

Morris Day – Musical career – Walt Reeder
The Time’s most prolific and visible period came in 1984, when Day played the antagonist to Prince in his feature films Purple Rain and Graffiti Bridge, which helped establish Day’s playboy stage presence. Typically escorted by his valet, “Jerome” (Jerome Benton), Day won fans with his exaggerated vanity (“Jerome bring me my mirror!”) and strutting bravado (“Ain’t nobody bad like me!”), acting as a comic foil to Prince’s romantic, sensitive lead. This persona was further exploited for comic effect on The Time’s records, on songs such as “Chili Sauce” and “If the Kid Can’t Make You Come” from the album Ice Cream Castle.

That album, the group’s most popular, is best remembered for the infectious singles “Jungle Love” and the Rufus Thomas influenced, “The Bird.” With their palpable pop energy and catchy choruses, both songs were hits on both urban and pop radio. ()

With the breakup of The Time in 1984, Day began his solo career. The low sales of his solo albums such as 1987’s Daydreaming (which spawned the single “Fishnet”) and his most commercially viable solo album, Guaranteed were a blow to his career. Walt Reeder

In 1986 Morris Day married Judith Day. They were married for 22 years, until 2008. They had three children together. Walt Reeder Entertainment

Walt Reeder: The Gap Band – Early years

Walt Reeder: The Gap Band – Early years

After having grown up with a Pentecostal minister father, Ronnie Wilson formed the Greenwood, Archer, and Pine Street Band in 1967, with Tuck Andress (later of Tuck and Patti), Roscoe “Toast” Smith and Chris Clayton. In 1972, Ronnie’s younger brother Charlie joined the band, and their younger brother Robert became the band’s bassist in 1973. Eventually the band would be condensed to comprise the trio of Ronnie, Robert and Charlie Wilson.

Early on, the group took on a funk sound more reminiscent of the early 70s. Simmons had recently gotten a distribution deal with Mercury/PolyGram.

Walt Reeder Entertainment

The Gap Band – Later years

While their 1986 cover of “Going in Circles” went to #2 on the R&B charts, and the album it was released on, Gap Band VII hit #6 R&B, the album almost became their first in years to miss the Billboard 200, peaking at a mere #159.

Although they were beginning to struggle stateside, the group found their greatest success in the UK when their 1987 single “Big Fun” from Gap Band 8 reached #4 in the UK Singles Chart. 1988’s Straight from the Heart was their last studio album with Total Experience.

The Gap Band caught a small break in 1988 with the Keenan Ivory Wayans film I’m Gonna Git You Sucka. They contributed the non-charting “You’re So Cute” and the #14 R&B title track to the film (The first was not on the soundtrack, but was used in the film). Their first song on their new label, Capitol Records, 1989’s “All of My Love” (from their album Round Trip), is, to date, their last #1 R&B hit. The album also produced the #8 R&B “Addicted to Your Love” and the #18 R&B “”We Can Make It Alright.” They left Capitol records the next year and went on a five year hiatus from producing new material.

During the 1990s, the band released three non-charting studio albums and two live albums. The only album to chart was the live album Live & Well, which peaked at #54 R&B in 1996. Walt Reeder

The Gap Band – Legacy – Walt Reeder Entertainment:

In 1992, Charlie ventured into a solo career and has had several moderate R&B hits on his own. Wilson’s vocals were credited in part for inspiring the vocal style of New Jack Swing artists Guy, Aaron Hall, Keith Sweat, and R. Kelly. The band reunited in 1996, and issued The Gap Band: Live and Well, a live greatest hits album.

On August 26, 2005, The Gap Band was honored as a BMI Icon at the 57th annual BMI Urban Awards. The honor is given to a creator who has been “a unique and indelible influence on generations of music makers.”Outstanding” alone remains one of the most sampled songs in history and has, astonishingly, been used by over 150 artists.

Robert Wilson died of a heart attack at his home in Palmdale, California on August 15, 2010. Walt Reeder

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Walt Reeder: The Gap Band – Sampling

Since the 1990s, many The Gap Band hits have been sampled and covered by R&B and Hip-Hop artists such as Ashanti, Soul For Real, Nas, 69 Boyz, Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube, Jermaine Dupri, Da Brat, II D Extreme, Blackstreet, Shaquille O’Neal, Vesta, Mia X, Big Mello and Mary J. Blige. “Outstanding” was sampled for a 1990s commercial for malt liquor, it was also sampled by hit producer Heavy D for his boy band prodigies Soul For Real’s hit single “Every Little Thing” which reached #17 on the Hot 100 Charts at the time of release. Musicians inspired by The Gap Band include R. Kelly, Keith Sweat, Ruff Endz, Guy, Blackstreet, II D Extreme, Mint Condition, Jagged Edge, D’Extra Wiley, and Aaron Hall.

“You Dropped a Bomb on Me” was featured in the hit 2004 videogame Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, playing on the fictional funk radio station Bounce FM.
“Burn Rubber On Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me)” was featured in DiRT 3 Walt Reeder Entertainment

The Gap Band – Success – Walt Reeder:

When Lonnie signed them, the group had twelve musicians. The group dropped most of their personnel. Raymond Calhoun (writer of “Outstanding”), Oliver Scott (co-writer of “Yearning For Your Love), and arranger/producer Malvin Dino Vice (co-writer of “Boys Are Back in Town”) were retained as members of the backing band and major contributors to the Gap Band’s later recordings. On their first Simmons-produced album, The Gap Band, they found chart success with songs such as “I’m in Love” and “Shake”, the latter becoming a Top 10 R&B hit in 1979.

Later that year, the group released “I Don’t Believe You Want to Get Up and Dance (Oops!)” on their album The Gap Band II. Although it did not hit the Hot 100, it soared to #4 R&B. The song, and the band’s musical output as a whole, became more P-Funk-esque,

In 1980 Charlie and Ronnie provided background vocals on Stevie Wonder’s 1980 hit “I Ain’t Gonna Stand For It” from Wonder’s album Hotter Than July (1980).

The band reached a whole new level of fame in 1980 with the release of the #1 R&B and #16 Billboard 200 The Gap Band III. The band adopted a formula of quiet-storm ballads (such as the #5 R&B song “Yearning for Your Love” and “Are You Living”) supported by anthemic funk songs (such as the R&B chart-topper “Burn Rubber on Me (Why You Wanna Hurt Me)” and “Humpin'”). They repeated this formula on the #1 R&B album Gap Band IV in 1982, which resulted in three hit singles: “Early in the Morning” (#1 R&B, #13 Dance, #24 Hot 100), “You Dropped a Bomb on Me” (#2 R&B, #31 Hot 100, #39 Dance), and “Outstanding” (#1 R&B, #24 Dance). It was during this time that former Brides of Funkenstein singer Dawn Silva joined them on tour.

Their 1983 effort, Gap Band V: Jammin’, went gold, but not quite as successful as the previous works, peaking at #2 R&B and #28 on the Billboard 200. The single “Party Train” peaked at #3 R&B and the song “Jam the Motha'” peaked at #16 R&B, but neither made it onto the Hot 100. The album’s closer “Someday” (a loose cover of Donny Hathaway’s “Someday We’ll All Be Free”) featured Stevie Wonder as a guest vocalist.

Their next work, Gap Band VI brought them back to #1 R&B in 1985, but the album sold fewer copies, and did not go gold. “Beep a Freak” hit #2 R&B and “I Found My Baby” peaked at #8 on the R&B charts, and “Disrespect” peaked at #18. That year, lead singer Charlie Wilson provided backing vocals on Zapp & Roger’s #2 R&B “Computer Love”. Walt Reeder Entertainment